M9 Ecommerce

How ebay works:

http://pages.cs.brandeis.edu/~magnus/ief248a/eBay/history.html

A history of amazon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon.com

The internet as a source of news and information

 

 Information packaging on the internet

Content mills – ehow for example, has an article on  “how to open a jar”. Articles often exist on the internet as vehicles for ads. These articles are often referred to as “clickbait”. They come up in search engines, and you click on them.

Aggregators – websites which take information from other websites and summarize it or, worse, copy it wholesale. They “aggregate” or “curate” this information on their own site.

Newspapers – most are losing money today, and trying to figure out how to make money on the internet.

Aggregator (Huffington Post) vs. Newspaper (New York Times)

New York Times Editor Bill Keller on Arianna Huffington’s Huffingtonpost.com:

The queen of aggregation is Arianna Huffington, who has discovered that if you take celebrity gossip, adorable kitten videos, posts from unpaid bloggers and news reports from other publications, array them on your website and add a left-wing soundtrack, millions of people will come.

Keller even accuses Huffington of pinching one of his lines after they appeared together on a discussion panel – although he doesn’t say what it was – before letting rip at AOL’s purchase of the Huffington Post:

Buying an aggregator and calling it a content play is a little like a company’s announcing plans to improve its cash position by hiring a counterfeiter.

Piracy? Counterfeiting? Harsh words. And Huffington wasn’t about to let them pass without challenge.

Pausing to deliver a brief slap – “After opening his piece by patting himself on the back so hard I’d be surprised if he didn’t crack a rib” – Huffington quickly turns to Keller’s “exceptionally misinformed attack”:

I wonder what site he’s been looking at. Not ours, as even a casual look at HuffPost will show. Even before we merged with AOL, HuffPost had 148 full-time editors, writers, and reporters engaged in the serious, old-fashioned work of traditional journalism. As long ago as 2009, Frank Rich praised the work of our reporters in his column. Paul Krugman more recently singled out the work of our lead finance writer. Columbia Journalism Review has credited our work for advancing the public’s understanding of the national foreclosure crisis, and a pair of our Washington reporters recently received a major journalism prize. Matthew Yglesias, Felix Salmon, Catherine Rampell, are among the many others who have cited the work of our reporters. Did Keller not notice that?

   Google and Facebook

How Search Engines Work

This page is part the overview of a much longer article. Just read the overview.

http://www.googleguide.com/google_works.html

https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/70897?hl=en

Google’s advice on how to promote your website:

https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/70897?hl=en

 

And this page:

http://www.googleguide.com/results_page.html

Implications of search engine architecture

  • Rare words rank higher in importance
  • Crowd sourced items are ranked higher.

     

How does google make money?

http://www.splatf.com/2011/10/google-revenue/

How Facebook makes money

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/how-does-facebook-make-money.php

 

Current Issues with Google and Facebook

Google and Facebook Issues

Now that you have some context, this may make sense:
https://blogs.msdn.com/b/jw_on_tech/archive/2012/03/13/why-i-left-google.aspx?Redirected=true

The comments are interesting too.

Current Threats to Ecommerce

http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/04/23/potent-in-the-wild-exploits-imperil-customers-of-100000-e-commerce-sites/

Threats to Internet Advertising and Promotion

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/121551/bot-bubble-click-farms-have-inflated-social-media-currency